EM-kilpailut 2006 maajoukkuekilpailu

TEAM COMPETITION QUALIFYING

ROUND 1: 

1. As well as making the news and needing Jacques Chirac’s permission [the French President allows about 20 and refuses 30 or so similar applications each year], what was remarkable about the wedding in Nice of Madame Christelle Demichel (as she is now named) to her fiancé, Eric in February 2004 ? 

A: HE WAS DEAD (Policeman, killed in 2002. Weddings can be granted e.g. to legitimise children: Art. 171 Code Civil)

2. Italian scientists recently discovered a huge underwater volcano off the southern coast of Sicily. The base of this volcano covers an area larger than Rome. The volcano has been named after which pre-Socratic Greek whose philosophy was the origin of the cosmogenic theory of the four classical elements ? 

A: EMPEDOCLES

3. Based on a 1995 Michael Chabon novel, which acclaimed motion picture starred Michael Douglas, Frances McDormand, Katie Holmes, Robert Downey Jr. and Tobey Maguire, and in 2000 earned Bob Dylan a ‘Best Song’ Academy Award ? 

A: WONDER BOYS (‘Things Have Changed’)

4. In the last Winter Olympics, Canada won the men’s curling competition and the women’s ice hockey.  Which country took the gold medal in the women’s curling and the men’s ice hockey ? 

A: SWEDEN

5. Many of its craters have been given names - most coming from the mythologies of the peoples of the Arctic. One of Jupiter’s many satellites, it is believed to be the most heavily cratered moon in our solar system.  It is named for which nymph, the ‘most beautiful’ in Greek mythology ? 

A: CALLISTO

6. In January 2006 one of the founding fathers of video art died at his apartment in Miami, Florida. In the 1960’s this South Korean-born artist was one of the founding fathers of the Fluxus art movement, known for using rapid cuts and fast motion in video performances.  What was his name ? 

A: (Nam June) PAIK

7. In 2004 Lissa Morgenthaler-Jones launched a campaign to seek an amendment to Article 2, Section 1, Clause 5 of the United States Constitution.  To what end did she do this (so what’s her aim, clue ~ think who’ll be the main beneficiary) ? 

A: ‘AMEND FOR ARNOLD’ ‘ARNIE FOR PRESIDENT’ or NON-US BORN RESIDENT

8. What is the heaviest of all the elements that are represented by a single letter in Mendeleev’s periodic table ? 

A: URANIUM (U) URAN URANAS

9. A mountain and a peninsula, this World Heritage Site is home to 20 Eastern Orthodox monasteries and forms an autonomous theocratic state within the sovereignty of which European nation ? 

A: GREECE (Mount Athos)

10. Since the USA has not been too popular in Iran in recent years, producers in that country were urged to provide alternatives to popular American commodities, such as soft drinks. Iran’s answer to Coca-Cola and Pepsi is named after the miraculous spring near the city of Mekka where Hagar, a wife of Abraham (Ibrahim), drew water for her son Ishmael. This cola brand is especially popular across the Middle East.  What is the name of the brand ? 

A: ZAMZAM cola or ZEMZEM

11 ‘Madaraka Day’ (celebrated on June 1st each year) commemorates the day that internal self-rule was achieved after decades of ‘armed struggle’ in the 20th Century.  ‘Madaraka Day’ is celebrated in which African country ?  

A: KENYA

12 Man Ray photographed Rrose Sélavy on several occasions. Under this name ‘she’ (Sélavy) published a 1939 book of puns and word games.  Which famous Dada and Surrealist artist invented for himself this female alter ego - Rrose Sélavy (in French the name sounds like ‘Eros That's Life’) - who was to make a number of appearances in his friends’ works ? 

A: Marcel DUCHAMP

13 Its principal character, Troy Maxson, a former player in the Negro baseball leagues, is the first black man to drive a garbage truck in Pittsburgh; which play by August Wilson - his second to go to Broadway - secured a Tony Award for James Earl Jones and won its author a Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1987 ? 

A: ‘FENCES’
  
14: Jobari (below) was the mascot for the 5th staging of an International sports event, hosted by Niamey, in Niger, in December 2005.  What linked all the competitors ? 

A: FRENCH SPEAKERS (Jeux de la Francophonie)

15: What name is given to any of almost 100 species of semi-terrestrial marine crabs belonging to the family Ocypodidae, and closely related to Ghost crabs ?

A: FIDDLER or CALLING (Wenkkrab) SPELEMANN GEIGER/STREICHER SMUIKININKAS  

 
ROUND 2:

1. Also the name of a number of cities etc. in the USA, in the 1983 Stephen King novel of the same name, which marque (make) of car is ‘Christine’ ? 

A: PLYMOUTH Fury/Belvedere

2. Which name is common to all of the following …

• an angel played by Alan Rickman in the 1999 film ‘Dogma’,
• the malevolent Regent of the Kingdom of Heaven in novelist Philip Pullman's ‘His Dark Materials’ trilogy,
• the voice of God in Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman's novel ‘Good Omens’,
• Heaven’s angelic scribe, as described in sections of the Talmud, and
• an angel to whom guitarist Carlos Santana credits his career’s revitalisation ? 

A: METATRON

3. On 2 January 2006 an explosion in the Sago Mine near the town of Tallmansville led to the death of 12 miners after they first had been reported saved.  In which American state, with a strong coal industry, did this tragedy take place ? 

A: WEST-VIRGINIA

4. Located northeast of Moscow, Ivanovo, Kostroma, Pereslavl-Zalesskiy, Rostov Velikiy, Rybinsk, Sergiyev Posad and Yaroslavl are among Russia’s most picturesque cities. They are commonly known by what collective name ? 

A: GOLDEN RING

5. This condition is associated with mild hemolytic anemia. In severe cases, the disease can be treated by removing the spleen. Which hereditary condition causes red blood cells, which are supposed to be round, to have a slightly oval or elliptical shape ? 

A: OVALOCYTOSIS or ELLIPTOCYTOSIS (nor. Cytosis=CYTOSE CYTOSIS/ZYTOSE CITOZË)


6. Which Caribbean country with a population of 165,000 has produced two Nobel Prize winners – Derek Walcott (Literature) and Sir Arthur Lewis (Economics) ?  

A: ST LUCIA

7. “Mine eyes have seen the orgy of the launching of the Sword;
He is searching out the hoardings where the stranger's wealth is stored;
He hath loosed his fateful lightnings, and with woe and death has scored;
His lust is marching on.”

A parody of American imperialism in the wake of the Philippine-American War.  Which famous writer penned ‘The Battle Hymn of the Republic, Updated’ ? 

A: Mark TWAIN or Samuel Langhorn CLEMENS

8. By winning the 3,000m race in the 2006 World Indoor Championships, which Ethiopian athlete became the first runner ever to hold world titles outdoors, indoors and in cross-country ?  

A: Kenenisa BEKELE

9. Starring Michael Pitt, the 2005 movie ‘Last Days’ by director Gus van Sant concerns the final hours of which famous individual ? 

A: Kurt COBAIN

10. Henry Luce founded this Time-Warner owned photojournalism magazine in 1936. It was a mammoth success. In its heyday - from launch until the early 1960s - it was America’s most influential and popular magazine, being read by tens of millions. Its impact on US public opinion, especially among the exploding suburban middle class, is incalculable. Publication ceased in 1972, but then it returned as a monthly from 1978 to 2000.  Starting in October 2004, which magazine resumed weekly publication as a supplement to U.S. newspapers ?  

A: LIFE

11. These islets and their surrounding coral reef form a unique marine area 60 km west of Geraldton, Western Australia. They were named by Dutch sea captain Frederick de Houtman in 1619.  Because he found the islets and reefs to be very, very dangerous, he named them Houtman's Abrolhos - “Abra os olhos” or “abri vossos olhos” being a Portuguese instruction to do what ? 

A: KEEP YOUR EYES OPEN

12. In the list of players who have scored the most goals at the top level in domestic league football, ‘Pele’ is in 3rd place, Josef ‘Pepi’ Bican 2nd, and in first place is a Brazilian who, between 1986 and 2001, was top-scorer in the leagues of Brazil, Holland and Spain, in 13 seasons. What is his name ? 

A: ROMARIO (de Souza Faria)

13. This bathing resort is a popular holiday destination in Egypt especially noted for aquatic sports (diving, snorkelling, sailing, windsurfing).  Founded early in the 20th century it stretches for about 40km along the Red Sea coast and contains Dahar (its oldest part) and Sakkala (hotel quarter).  What is it called ? 

A: HURGHADA (Al Ghardaqah)

14.   Tokyo’s governor Shintaro Ishihara is one of Japan's best known nationalist and populist politicians, and one of its most controversial. He once said “… old women who live after they have lost their reproductive function are useless and are committing a sin". In 2005 several language schools brought a court action against him after he insulted which Western tongue, saying it didn’t qualify as ‘international’ because it “is a language in which nobody can count" ? 

A: FRENCH
  
15. Between 1975 and 1977 renowned designer Miguel Berrocal produced 10,000 copies of this interlocking puzzle, requiring sequential assembly. Of these, 6 were made in gold, 1,000 in silver and the rest in bronze. It was the last puzzle of this style ever to be made, and was one of the finest.  Depicting the torso of the famous bullfighter Manuel Laureano Rodríguez Sánchez, by what name was the man (and this puzzle) better known ?

A:  MANOLETE



ROUND 3:

 

1. In 1983 the French singer Mireille Mathieu scored a hit with the song ‘Together We’re Strong’. This was a duet with which star from the US TV soap ‘Dallas’ ? 

A: Patrick DUFFY


2. During WWII, Sensuikan Toku was a class of Japanese Imperial Navy vessel. They could carry up to 4 compact floatplane-bombers, folded & stored on a small hangar which opened forward to a small catapult.  Only three vessels were ever built.  What was most remarkable about their having an airborne capability ? 

A: They could SUBMERGE (they were submarines) (onderzeeërs / duikboten) UBÅT/UNDERVANNSBÅT  NEDSENKBAR UNTERSEEBOOT/UBOOT POVANDENINIS


3. Born in Gibraltar, this fashion designer graduated in 1984 with a collection based on the French Revolution. He moved to Paris in 1995 and was appointed designer at Givenchy, leaving in 1997 for Dior. Specialising in extravagant trends, he’s responsible for a recent ‘homeless-chic’ collection. Who is he ? 

A: John GALLIANO

4. This was one of the first completely graphic adventure (video) games with 16 colour graphics. Released in 1987 the aim was to help the title character find true love and lose his virginity. What was the title character’s full name ? 

A: LEISURE SUIT LARRY in the Land of the Lounge Lizards

5. It is a technique used in art, mostly in sculpture and painting, in which the artist uses unnatural proportion or scale to depict the relative importance of the figures they depict.  For example, in Ancient Egyptian times, people of higher status or importance would sometimes be drawn or sculpted larger than those of lower status or importance.  What name is given to this technique ? 

A: HIERARCHIC proportion

6. He opposed Italy joining the Axis against the Allies in World War Two and resigned as head of the armed forces after the Army’s defeat in Greece. After the Allies took Sicily, Italy’s Fascist Grand Council decided to sign a separate peace with the Allies. Benito Mussolini was dismissed and as the new Prime Minister he declared martial law and Il Duce arrested. On 23rd September 1943, he and General Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the Italian surrender. What was the name of this man who replaced Mussolini as Italian Prime Minister ? 

A: Pietro BADOGLIO

7. This phenomenon occurs in live-cell fluorescence microscopy when illuminating a fluorescent molecule (a fluorophore) causes the selective death of the cells expressing it.  While not completely understood, it seems to be clear that the main cause is the formation of oxygen radicals due to non-radiative energy transfer.  What is this phenomenon called ? 

A: PHOTOTOXICITY

8. Together with the Gemara (its commentary) it comprises the Talmud. Next to the Scriptures it is the basic textbook of Jewish life and thought, and is traditionally considered to be an integral part of the Torah revealed to Moses on Mount Sinai. In Judaism, by what name is this codified collection of Oral Law known ? 

A: MISHNA


9. Originally produced on Broadway in 1968 the Neil Simon musical ‘Promises, Promises’ includes the song "I'll Never Fall in Love Again".  With music by Burt Bacharach and lyrics by Hal David, it was based on which Billy Wilder film ? 

A: THE APARTMENT

10. The best-selling prescription drug in the world is Lipitor, earning Pfizer $12.9 billion in 2005. It belongs to a group of cholesterol-lowering drugs that are very effective for lowering LDL ("bad") cholesterol levels and have few immediate short-term side effects. Also known as HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, by what name are these drugs better known ? 

A: STATINS

11. Founded by Nymphus Hatch in 1795 the Hasty Pudding Club is named for the traditional American dish that the founding members ate at their first meeting.  The club counts five U.S. Presidents (John Adams, John Quincy Adams, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt, and John F. Kennedy) among its alumni.  Which University is the Hasty Pudding Club centred upon ? 

A: HARVARD

12. The Noachian, Hesperian and Amazonian periods are all epochs in the geological history of what ? 

A: MARS (the Planet)

13. Detroit Demolition won the NWFA Championship games in 2003, 2004 & 2005.  In 2006 D.C. Divas won the Championship, defeating Oklahoma City Lightning 28 points to 7 in the deciding fixture.  Which women’s professional sport ? 

A: AMERICAN FOOTBALL
  
14. (see below) Consisting of a khanjar dagger in its sheath superimposed upon two crossed swords, this is the traditional symbol of which nation ? 

A: Muscat and OMAN 

15. What name is given to the selection of appetizers or small dishes in eastern Mediterranean cuisine which are also served in cafes and restaurants in the Middle East ?
  

A:  MEZE / MEZZES / MAZA / MEZEDES

 

ROUND 4:

1. In Norse mythology, the goddess Hel, a daughter of Loki, rules over the cold and misty world of the dead. Found under the roots of the world tree Yggdrasil, under what name is this world known ? 

A: NIFLHEIM

2. The New Zealander Colin Murdoch has contributed to the saving of millions of human lives, having invented the disposable syringe. He also invented something that has saved millions of animal lives.  What was it ? 

A: TRANQUILLISER GUN OR TRANSQUILISER DART BEDØVELSE TRANQUILIZER/BERUHIGUNGSMITTEL TRANKVILIZATORIUS


3. Pete Sampras is considered one of the best men’s tennis players in history. His record of 14 Grand Slam victories is unchallenged. His Wimbledon performances were especially legendary. From 1993 to 2000 he won all but one Wimbledon title. The year he didn’t win he was surprisingly eliminated in the quarter finals. Who was the only player to defeat Pete Sampras in 8 Wimbledon tournaments ? 

A: Richard KRAJICEK

4. Who has composed most of the music scores for the films of Bosnian director Emir Kusturica, most notably for the movies ‘Time of the Gypsies’, ‘Arizona Dream’ and ‘Underground’ ? 

A: Goran BREGOVIC

5. Which word, derived from the Arabic word for ‘infidel’, is banned in South Africa and Namibia, because during apartheid it was became offensive word used by whites to describe members of the non-white population ? 

A: KAFFIR


6. Due to exposure to iodine radioactive fallout after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, the occurrence of which type of cancer increased about 20 to 30-fold among the children of Belarus and Ukraine ? 

A: THYROID (SCHILDKLIER) SKJOLDBRUSKKJERTEL SCHILDDRÜSE SKYDLIAUKË


7. The end of this period saw the largest mass extinction of life in Earth’s history. It is divided into Tatarian, Kazanian, Kungurian, Artinskian, Sakmarian and Asselian subdivisions. Which geologic period lasted from 290 to 248 million years ago and was the last period of the Paleozoic Era ? 

A: PERMIAN

8. He was born in 1930.  The best-known work of this Polish dramatist and writer is The Tango (1964) which is still performed throughout Europe. The Tango is a biological and psychological observation of creation of totalitarian mechanisms. His works are sharply comical and they belong to the Theatre of the Absurd, creating their effects through illusion, political and historic references, distortion, and parody. In 1963 he emigrated to France and later moved to Mexico before returning to Poland in 1997.  Who ? 

A: Slawomir MROZEK

9. The name of which fruit is derived from its Nahuatl name 'ahuacatl', meaning ‘testicle’ ? 

A: AVOCADO AVOKADO AVOKADAS

10. In 1979 he lost a foot and a kneecap in a road accident.  In 1981 he founded the Cooperative Wilderness Handicapped Outdoor Group (C.W.HOG).  In 1998, on his third attempt, who became the first disabled person to scale Mount Everest ? 

A: Tom WHITTAKER

11. His second law states that the sum of the potential differences around a circuit must be zero. In electrical engineering, whose first law states that the sum of the currents flowing towards a point is equal to the sum of the currents flowing away from that point ?  

A: Gustav KIRCHHOFF

12. Which name is shared by a 1954 science fiction movie (about giant ants caused by nuclear tests), a novel by Joyce Carol Oates in The Wonderland Quartet, and a Northern-Ireland band featuring Van Morrison ? 

A: THEM (book title is ‘them’)

13.  One of Bollywood’s most popular stars, he has hosted India’s version of  ‘Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?’ and is a former member of India’s Parliament. What is his name ? 

A: Amitabh BACHCHAN also known as AMITABH, AMITJI, or BIG B
  
14. In October 2006 this country adopted a new flag (see image, top stripe is blue, bottom green). Which country ? 

A: LESOTHO  (symbol depicts is a traditional hat)

15: Easily winning FIDE’s World Championships in 2005 in Argentina, most regard this Bulgarian as the strongest chess player at the moment. What is his name ?
 
A:  Veselin TOPALOV

  

TEAM COMPETITION SEMI-FINAL

 

1: MUSICA

1. The only ballet for which Beethoven composed music (Op. 43) takes as its inspiration a creation myth.  What was the ballet's title ?

A: Creatures of PROMETHEUS  (Die Geschöpfe des Prometheus)

 

2. Having a New Testament theme and first heard in 1803, which piece of Beethoven music (Op. 85) was more of a dramatic oratorio rather than a religious choral mass or dramatic opera ?

A: CHRIST ON THE MOUNT OF OLIVES, CHRISTUS am ÖLBERGE, CHRISTUS op de OLIJFBERG … OLJEBERGET … ÖLBERG  ALYVØ KALNAS

3. In full it is the Sonata No. 8 in C Minor, Op. 13, what is the nickname of this Beethoven Piano sonata - the Adagio cantabile from the second movement of which was borrowed by Billy Joel for the chorus melody to his song 'This Night' (featured on the album 'An Innocent Man') ?

A: PATHETIQUE

 
2: MOTORIZED INSECTS

1. Which engineer designed the famous VW Beetle?

A: Ferdinand PORSCHE

2. This model was made famous with the 1966 film ‘The Graduate’ (Dustin Hoffmann’s character drove one). The car appeared in 1966 and was produced until 1993. Widely regarded as a design classic, it underwent few aesthetic and mechanical changes. Which car and model?

A: ALFA ROMEO SPIDER


3. After WWII Italian engineer Corradino D'Ascanio set out to design a simple, sturdy, and economical vehicle that was also comfortable and elegant. The result was an aircraft-inspired design that to this day remains forward-thinking and unique among all other two-wheeled vehicles. First produced in 1946, the new vehicle provided a model on which nearly every other scooter made since has been based. What was the name of this scooter?

A: VESPA (produced by Piaggio) "Sembra una vespa!" ("It looks like a wasp!") exclaimed Piaggio president Enrico Piaggio when he first saw the model.

 

3: PANORAMA

1. Officially unveiled in its new home in 1977, it is one of the largest panoramic paintings in the world and was relocated to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the siege it depicts.  We see here part of a panorama painting of the Russian capture of which Ottoman held city ?

A: PLEVNA or PLEVEN Epopee


2. Dating from 1895 and now displayed in Canada this is the world’s largest cyclorama and depicts Jerusalem at the time of the crucifixion.  With the help of 5 assistants it was created in Munich by the artist responsible for the panoramas of the Siege of Plevna and the Battle of Gettysburg (his best known work). Who was this Frenchman ?


A: Paul PHILIPPOTEAUX


3. The artists who worked on this panorama included the famous Wojciech Kossak; which battle of 1794 is depicted here ?

A: RACLAWICE

 

4: NATURAL RESOURCES
 
1. The mid 19th century saw a ‘rush’ to obtain which valuable, renewable natural resource, in places such as Walvis Bay (in present day Namibia) ?

A: (Bird) GUANO  EKSKREMENTAI (PAUKÐÈIØ IÐMATOS / PAUKÐÈIØ)


2. Bird Guano contains around 11-16% nitrogen, 8-12 % phosphoric acid and 2-3% of an oxide of which element (listed in the periodic table among the alkali metals) ?

A: POTASSIUM (or Potash); KALIUM KALIS or KALIUMCARBONAT, or POTTEASKE POTAÐAS / KALIO KARBONATAS


3. As well as that of birds and bats, which other creature’s excrement is collected as guano for fertiliser – in particular around the Lobos islands off north-western Peru ?

A: SEALS (or Pinnipeds - Zeehonden) SELER, ROBBEN  RUONIAI

 

5: CELEBRATION

1. Which natural phenomenon is celebrated wtih an annual holiday in Egypt on August 15 ? 

A: FLOODING OF THE NILE (‘Wafaa El-Nil’)


2. The Coptic Church also celebrates the flooding of the Nile with a ceremony called Esba` al-shahid in which a martyr's relic is thrown into the river.  In simple terms, what relic ?

A: FINGER (Esba` al-shahid‘ means “the martyr's finger”)


3. Often linked to the Nile’s annual flooding and the way in which man was able to turn it to his advantage, what is the substance of the verse in the Old Testament found at Ecclesiastes 11:1 ?

A: ‘CAST YOUR BREAD UPON THE WATER, it shall return to you in due season’
Accept “Throw your bread on the river” or similar, but “bread” must feature?!”                                         ‘Werp uw brood uit op het water’
KAST DITT BRØD PÅ VANNET (Forkynneren 11:1)
LAß DEIN BROT ÜBER DAS WASSER FAHREN (BIBEL, BUCH DES SALOMO/KOHELET 11:1)
MESKITE SAVO DUONÀ Á VANDENÁ


6: FAMOUS SONS

The Sons of Lee Marvin is a 'semi-secret society' established as a joke by American film director Jim Jarmusch.  Entry criteria is that the person must have some physical resemblance or plausibly look like a son of actor Lee Marvin (so women are not allowed to join). So, identify these three confirmed or rumoured members of the society!

1. An Australian rock musician, songwriter, author, screenwriter and occasional actor, at the 2006 Venice Film Festival he received the Gucci Award for his script for The Proposition ?

A: Nick CAVE


2. Born in Canada, among other things he is an outspoken advocate for environmental issues and small farmers, having co-founded the benefit concert Farm Aid, and in 1986 helped found The Bridge School together with his wife Pegi ?

A: Neil YOUNG


3. This American singer-songwriter, composer, and actor has a distinctive voice that was once described as sounding "like it was soaked in a vat of bourbon, left hanging in the smokehouse for a few months and then taken outside and run over with a car." ?

A: Tom WAITS
     

7: RATS


1. This emergency energy source consists of a small propeller and connected generator.  In case of the loss of both primary and auxiliary power, a RAT will power an aircraft’s vital systems such as flight controls, hydraulics and flight-critical instruments. In this context, what is the meaning of the abbreviation RAT ?

A: RAM AIR TURBINE


2. ‘De rats’ is a game-play map freely available for use with which team-based, tactical first-person shooter game (its name commonly abbreviated to CS) developed from the computer game ‘Half-Life’ ?

A: COUNTER STRIKE


3. Produced by Pro Co Sound, the Pro Co Rat is used by musicians playing which instrument ? 

ELECTRIC GUITAR Effects pedal (favoured by Kurt Cobain, Thom Yorke, Peter Buck, Dave Gimour)

 
8: NATIONS CONTEST


1. Which famous sporting trophy was originally known as the 'One Hundred Sovereign Cup' and later, mistakenly, as the 'One Hundred Guineas Cup' ?

A: AMERICA’S CUP

2. A series of races was created to choose which challenger earns the right to compete with the holder for yachting's America's Cup.  What name is given to the trophy awarded to the winner of this qualifying series ?

A: LOUIS VUITTON Cup


3. With Switzerland possessing no coastline, which Spanish city next year becomes the first place in Europe to host the America's Cup in 150 years ?

A: VALENCIA

9: HIGH IN FRANCE

Many Frenchmen still believe Mont Blanc is Europe’s highest mountain. France hosts some places of considerable altitude …

1. With an altitude of 3,298 meters (10,800 feet), this peak is the highest in the French Pyrenees. It is also the site of the largest Pyrenean glacier, the Ossoue. What is the name of this mountain?

A: (Grande) VIGNEMALE or PIQUE LONGUE


2. It is sometimes said the Corsican countryside is among the most beautiful in the world. In the middle of all this beauty is a mountain peak rising to 2,706 meters (8,900 feet). From its summit it is possible to see as far as Marseille and Rome. What is the name of Corsica’s highest peak? 

A: Monte CINTO


3. In the French department of Hautes-Alpes is a city at whose heart is a fortress built by Vauban in the 17th century to protect the region from the Austrians. Located on the Durance river between the cols of the Granon and the Izoard, which city claims to be the highest in Europe at an altitude of 1,350 meters (4,400 ft) ?

A:BRIANÇON

10: STRAIGHT

1. In 1999 David Lynch directed a road movie based on the true story of the aged Alvin Straight who journeys through Iowa on his lawnmower for 6 weeks after he hears that his brother Lyle has suffered a stroke.  Which veteran actor, who died the following year, played the elderly man in ‘The Straight Story’ ?

A:Richard FARNSWORTH


2. Sometimes called the Labrador Strait, what waterway in Eastern Canada separates the island of Newfoundland from the Labrador Peninsula?

A: Strait of BELLE ISLE


3. The Enola Gay was the plane that dropped the atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima, but it didn’t go there alone. In total seven B29’s took part in the mission, among them 3 weather planes. Two flew to the alternative targets Kokura and Nagasaki. The 3rd weather plane flew to Hiroshima and reported that there was good visibility, thereby signing the city’s death warrant. What was the name of that weather plane ?

A: STRAIGHT FLUSH

11 : BI?

1. The ‘Bistable Multivibrator’ might have been the title of a XXX movie but instead it’s a very common pulsed digital circuit that can serve as a one-bit memory. What more usual name is given to this kind of electronic building block ?

A: FLIP-FLOP


2. In the southern USA, from Virginia to Texas, the area is often called the ‘Bible Belt’. There a heavy emphasis is laid on a literal interpretation of the Bible. ‘Bible Belt’ was coined in the early 1920s by an American journalist, social critic, cynic and writer, with as nickname ‘The American Nietzsche’. He was one of the most influential writers of the first half of the 20th century. His works included ‘In Defense of Women’ (1917), ‘The American Language’ (1919) and ‘Libido for the Ugly’ (1927). What was his name ?

A: (H.L.) MENCKEN


3. In the Olympic curriculum since 1924, what name is given to the sport that is a combination of cross-country skiing (langlaufen) and ski jumping ?

A: NORDIC COMBINED or NORDIC COMBINATION (not the Biathlon; see the question mark at the category’s name) NOORDSE COMBINATIE


12: GAY

1. In 1805, which French chemist and physicist discovered that the basic composition of the atmosphere does not change with decreasing pressure, but is best known for first formulating the law that states a gas expands linearly with a fixed pressure and rising temperature?

A: Joseph Louis GAY-LUSSAC (In US this law is sometimes called Charles’ Law; which obviously does not fit the question)


2. Before singing solo, the American soul and R&B legend Marvin Gaye recorded several duets with female artists. Most notably was one with a singer (b1946) who died of a brain tumour at the tender age of 24 in 1970. In 1967 they had the massive hit ‘Ain’t no mountain high enough’ and other recordings included ‘Ain’t nothing like the real thing’ and ‘You’re all I need to get by’. What was her name?

A: Tammi TERRELL  (do we mention the ‘Onion Song’ ?)


3. A similar flag is sometimes used as peace flag, as flag to mark of Inca territory or to indicate Buddhist communities; derived from its colours, what name is given to the flag used by the Lesbian and Gay movement to indicate gay pride ?

A: RAINBOW FLAG

13: BIOCHEMISTRY

1. Sometimes called the ‘citric acid cycle’, the series of chemical reactions in living cells that utilize oxygen as part of respiration is usually named after a German, later British, biochemist who first proposed this part of the metabolism. What is the name of the cycle or the scientist?

A: (Hans) KREBS (cycle)


2. In 1833 French chemist Anselme Payen discovered diastase which catalyses the breakdown of starch into maltose. Diastase was the first discovered molecule of a kind of protein that speeds up chemical reactions. Under what name are these proteins jointly known?

A: ENZYMES


3. This scientist won the 1958 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his complete determination of the amino acid sequence of insulin. His development of the chain termination method of DNA sequencing which enabled him for the first time to sequence a complete genome, earned him another Chemistry Nobel Prize, making him the 4th person to win a second Nobel Prize. What is his name?

A: Frederick SANGER

 14: SOUTH AFRICA

1. This word means a black urban criminal, a street thug or gang member in the black townships in South Africa. In the past the word tended to conjure up a glamorous gangster image, but today the word is used more generally as a name for displaced young criminals. Which word?

A: TSOTSI


2. These people were the original inhabitants of much of southern Africa. Culturally they are divided into the hunter gatherer Bushmen and the pastoral Hottentots. Over the centuries many branches of these peoples were absorbed or displaced by Bantu peoples migrating south in search of new lands. During the colonial era they lived in South Africa, Namibia and Botswana, and were massacred in great numbers by Dutch, British, and German settlers. Y chromosome data indicates that they were some of the first lineages to branch from the main human family tree, some 100,000 years ago. Which people?

A: KHOISAN accept KHOI or SAN  (2 component groups)


3. One of the main roads in downtown Windhoek is named after a man who was colonial governor of German South-West Africa. The street name may surprise some, since the man’s son was a notorious Nazi leader. What was their surname ?

A: GÖRING (Heinrich Ernst and Hermann)

15: FELIDAE

1. This fiercely territorial medium-sized cat is also called Persian or African lynx. Its fur colour is variable: it may be wine-red, grey or sand-coloured. The cat’s most conspicuous feature is its long, tufted black ears, which also explain the origin of its name – Turkish for "black ear". Which cat ?

A: CARACAL (Caracal caracal) ØRKENGAUPE KARAKAL KARAKALAS


2. This medium sized Central-South American cat is closely related to the puma. Its coat is unspotted and uniform in colour, varying from gray to red. The two colour phases were once thought to represent two distinct species; the red one called "eyra". It has short legs and looks a bit like an otter; with short, rounded ears. Which cat ?

A: JAGUARUNDI (Herpailurus yagouaroundi) JAGUARUNDIS


3. This feline is the smallest cat in the Americas and is found only in Chile and Argentina. Little is known about it because they are extremely rare. Its most unusual characteristic is that it nests under trees in bamboo thickets. It has a base coat colour that ranges from grey brown to reddish brown and is marked with small dark spots and weighs 2.2 kg. Which cat ?

A: KODKOD or GUIGNA (Oncifelis guigna)  (NACHTKAT or KODKOD)

16: PARIS 1900

1. This event was introduced to the Olympic programme in Paris 1900 and lasted until 1920. The first event was won by a joint Danish-Swedish. It is said to be the only event where the winner moves backwards. Which sport ?

A: TUG OF WAR (or rope pulling) TOUWTREKKEN, TAUTREKKING, TAUZIEHEN or SEILZIEHEN VIRVËS TRAUKIMAS


2. 22-year old Margaret Abbott, daughter of novelist Mary Ives Abbott, was the first US female Olympic Champion. All because, as she said: “the other women apparently misunderstood the nature of the game scheduled for the day and turned up to play in high heels and tight skirts." In which sports did she compete ?

A: GOLF


3. This American athlete was the first sportsman to win four Olympic titles in a single Olympic Games – in 60 m, 200 m, 110 m hurdles and long jump. As of 2004, he remains the only track and field athlete to have achieved this in individual events. He retired from athletics in 1901 - the owner of 6 world records - and graduated from university. After being a dentist for some years, he became a track coach. Who was he ?

A: Alvin KRAENZLEIN

 
17: GEMSTONE LEGENDS

1. One day frisky Cupid cut the divine fingernails of Venus with an arrowhead while she was sleeping. He left the clippings scattered on the sand and the fates turned them into stone so that no part of the heavenly body would ever perish. So the gems name comes from Greek word for ‘fingernail’. Which gem?

A: ONYX


2. These gems come with an incomparable variety of colours. The reason, according to an old Egyptian legend, is that the gem, on its long journey up from the centre of the Earth, passed over a rainbow. In so doing it assumed the colours of the rainbow. And that is why it is still referred to as the 'gemstone of the rainbow' today. The name of this gem comes from the Singhalese words, which in translation means something like 'stone with mixed colours'. Which gem?

A: TOURMALINE


3. In Greek myth Dionysius, the god of intoxication, was angered one day by an insult from a mere mortal and swore revenge on the next mortal to cross his path. Along came an unsuspecting beautiful young maiden on her way to pay tribute to the goddess Diana. Diana turned her into a statue of pure crystalline quartz to protect her from Dionysius and his brutal claws. Dionysus wept tears of wine in remorse for his action at the sight of such a beautiful statue. The god's tears stained the quartz purple, creating the gem we know today. It is now known after the name of this maiden; the Greek work basically can be translated as "not drunken." Which gem?

A: AMETHYST


18: STRIKING SOUNDS

1. Zulu myth tells of a goddess who made a musical instrument by hanging gourds below wooden bars. The instrument, now named after her, was brought to South America in the early 16th century by Africans taken there as slaves; there, a Guatemalan called Sebastian Hurtado made an instrument with a wooden resonator pipe instead of gourd. This formed the basis of the modern instrument. Contemporary composers have utilized the unique sound of this instrument more and more in recent years. Which instrument?

A: MARIMBA


2. She was the first full-time solo professional percussionist in 20th century western society. Although nearly deaf, she performs with an extraordinarily wide variety of orchestras and contemporary musicians, giving over 100 concerts a year. Who ?

A: Evelyn GLENNIE


3. A klopotec is a wooden mechanical device on a high wooden pole, similar to a windmill. It is one of the symbols of Slovenia. What is it used for?

A: BIRD SCARER (in vineyards) or SCARECROW
VOGELVERSCHRIKKER FUGLESKREMSEL VOGELSCHEUCHE or VOGELSCHRECK BAIDYKLË / KALIAUSË

19: PAINTRESSES

1. Just two painters were exhibited in the first exhibitions by impressionists. One was Camille Pissarro, the other was the niece of the French painter Fragonard, who specialised in domestic scenes. In 1868 she became acquainted with Edouard Manet, who took a special interest in her and painted her several times, one instance is shown. Six years later she married his brother Eugene. What was her name ?


A: Berthe MORISOT

2. Born Maria Gorksa to a wealthy Warsaw family in 1898, in 1916 she moved to St Petersburg but was forced to flee to Paris in 1917 where she met Pablo Picasso, Jean Cocteau, Colette and Vita Sackville-West. She had a most fruitful time there, establishing herself as an Art Deco painter. In later life she moved to the US and died in Mexico in 1980. What was her name?


A: Tamara de LEMPICKA


Together with her life partner Mikhail Larionov, she was an exponent of near-abstract painting in Russia, known as Futurism and later Rayonnism. Apart from that she was also involved in Der Blaue Reiter and designed several stage sets for the Ballet Russes. What was the name of the artist whose work you see ?


A: Natalya GONCHAROVA

 

20: ‘BEAUTY TIPS’

1. Sam Levenson’s poem ‘Time Tested Beauty Tips’ was a personal favourite of which woman, born in Belgium in 1929 with the surname Ruston, who in 2006 was voted the most beautiful woman of all time by readers of New Woman magazine ?


A: Audrey HEPBURN

 

2. Emulating Marylyn Monroe, what did Hepburn do on 29 May 1963 ?


A: SANG ‘HAPPY BIRTHDAY’ TO John F KENNEDY ON HIS BIRTHDAY

 


3. Hepburn lived in Arnhem at the time of the 1944 battle.  One of the combatants, Terence Young (of Bond film fame) later directed her in which 1967 film thriller ?


A: WAIT UNTIL DARK

 

TIE BREAKERS

 

1. The principal quantum number of an atom gives the main energy level and traditionally the letters K, L, M etc. are used to refer to these levels or the orbits corresponding to them. What name is usually applied to mean any one of these levels or orbits ?

A: SHELLS  ATOOM  SCHILLEN

2. Which is the only US state that persists in having the Southern confederate flag as part of its state flag ?


A: MISSISSIPPI

3. The sister ship to the Battle Cruiser Bismark, launched in April 1939, was also intended to rais against Allied merchant shipping in the North Atlantic. In January 1942 she steamed to Norwegian waters where she remained for the rest of her career. In September 1943 she was attacked by British midget submarines and put out of action for the first time. Later subjected to continuous aerial bombing, she was finally sunk near Tromsø on 12 November 1944. Which ship ?


A: TIRPITZ

 

 
TEAM COMPETITION FINAL:


1: MUSICAL MUST

1. You hear a world-renowned Pakistani musician (1948-1997) singing ‘Mustt Musst’ (‘Lost In His Work’).  Usually referred to by his first name to distinguish him from his musician relations, who is the singer ?

A: NUSRAT Fateh Ali Khan


2. Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan was primarily noted for singing a style of devotional music called Qawwali.  It is associated with which mystical Islamic tradition ?

A: SUFISM or SUFI


3. Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan’s music featured in a number of Hollywood films, including Dead Man Walking and Natural Born killers.  A good friend of Peter Gabriel, it featured on the soundtrack to which Martin Scorsese film ?

A: THE LAST TEMPTATION OF CHRIST JESU SISTE FRISTELSE DIE LETZTE VERSUCHUNG CHRISTI PASKUTINIS KRISTAUS GUNDYMAS

 
2: GIMME SKIN

1. A 'Love Kills Slowly' banner entwined around skull & crossbones and heart motifs has become one of the best-selling designs by which noted San Francisco tattoo artist ? 

A: (Don) Ed HARDY
 

2. A name coined by Baron Jean-Louis Alibert (1768-1837) from the Greek meaning to resemble a crab’s claw; what name is given to a type of scar - an overgrowth of tissue at the site of a healed skin injury - which have been deliberately created as a form of decoration in places as diverse as pre-Colombian Mexico, the Sudan and Papua New Guinea ?

A: KELOID(s) [“chele – oid”]


3. Distinct from tattoo and tatau in that the skin was carved by chisels rather than punctured, and features skin grooves rather than a smooth surface, what name is given to the traditional body art and face marking of the New Zealand Maori ?

A: TA MOKO

3: CLASSICAL F

1. In 1905 this composer succeeded Théodore Dubois as director of the Paris Conservatoire, and kept that post until ill health and deafness forced him to resign in 1920. His pupils included Maurice Ravel, George Enesco, Jean Roger-Ducasse, Florent Schmitt, and Nadia Boulanger. He excelled as a songwriter of great refinement and sensitivity as well as a composer of every kind of chamber music. Among his best known works are his Requiem, the opera ‘Penelope’, the orchestral suite ‘Masques et Bergamasques’, and incidental music for ‘Pelléas et Mélisande’. Who was he ?

A: Gabriel Urbain FAURE (say “Foray”)


2. He was the most distinguished Spanish composer of the early 20th century. A nationalist at heart he was deeply influenced by the traditional music of his homeland, combining it with other European styles to create a unique musical voice. He composed ballets, songs and piano and orchestral works. His ballet El Sombrero de Tres Picos (The Three-Cornered Hat) was commissioned by Sergei Diaghilev and performed in its completed form in 1919 with sets and costumes by Pablo Picasso. Who was he ?

A: Manuel de FALLA (say “Fay-ya”)


3. This composer, organist and music teacher of Belgian origin (1822-1890), was one of the great figures in classical music in France (and the world) in the second half of the 19th century and was professor of Organ at the Paris Conservatory. He was the chief figure in the movement to give French music an emotional engagement, technical solidity, and seriousness comparable to that of German composers. As a composer he only fulfilled his potential in the final 10 years of his life. Renowned works include Symphony in D Minor and Variations symphoniques. Who?

A: Cesar FRANCK

4: ABANDON SHIP

1. Following two explosions on board his vessel on 10 July 1985, Captain Peter Willcox gave the order to abandon ship. Which ship ?

RAINBOW WARRIOR


2. What was the name of the Portuguese-born Greenpeace photographer who was killed on board the Rainbow Warrior when it was blown up by French agents ?

A: Fernando PEREIRA


3. In September 1985, France's minister of defence Charles Hernu resigned over the Rainbow Warrior attack.  Which Prime Minister admitted on television that agents of the French secret service, acting on orders, had sunk the boat ?

A: Laurent FABIUS

5: HOLY TRINITY

In cooking the phrase ‘Holy Trinity’ refers to the three ingredients key to a particular cuisine. The term is most commonly used in reference to Louisiana Creole and Cajun cuisine, so …

1. Which three ingredients form the ‘Holy Trinity’ of Louisiana Creole and Cajun cuisine ?

A: CELERY, Bell PEPPERS, and ONIONS SELDERIJ, PAPRIKA, UI / AJUIN
SELLERI, PAPRIKA, LØK SELLERIE, PAPRIKA UND ZWIEBELN
SALIERAS, PIPIRAI, SVOG?NAI

2. As well as Onion (again) which two ingredients complete the ‘Trinity’ of ‘wet spices’ in Indian cuisine ?

A: GARLIC and GINGER KNOF)LOOK, GEMBER HVITLØK INGEFÆR
KNOBLAUCH UND INGWER ÈESNAKAS, IMBIERAS

3. Sharing its name with a French town, what do we call a combination of onions, carrots and Pascal celery (or celeriac) in the ratio of 2:1:1 respectively ?

A: MIREPOIX


6: TO FINISH? 

1. In 'serious' music, which composer gives his name to this sequence of notes ?

A: J.S.BACH ('Bach Motif' : B flat, A, C, B natural – the last being known as "H" in German)


2. Perhaps the most celebrated result in mathematical logic, whose first incompleteness theorem states - "For any consistent formal theory that proves basic arithmetical truths, it is possible to construct an arithmetical statement that is true but not provable in the theory. That is, any theory capable of expressing elementary arithmetic cannot be both consistent and complete"?

A: Kurt GÖDEL


3. Who won the 1980 Pulitzer Prize for general non-fiction for his book 'Gödel, Escher, Bach: an Eternal Golden Braid' in which, inter alia, he explains that the insertion of Bach's motif into Contrapunctus XIV of the composer's 'The Art Of Fugue' prevented him (Bach) completing it because of Gödel's Incompleteness Theorem ?

A: Douglas HOFSTADTER

7: SONGBIRDS


1. In the course of her career as a solo artist, a member of the group Union Station, and as a record producer, she has won twenty Grammy Awards - more than any other woman, having overtaken even Aretha Franklin's tally. Born in 1971, who is she ?

A: Alison KRAUSS


2. Which Canadian musician, singer and songwriter founded 'Lilith Fair', a tour which showcased female musicians in the late 1990s ?

A: Sarah McLACHLAN


3. Sarah McLachlan's song 'Angel' is often used to highlight emotional scenes in TV shows and features in several soundtracks (including the film City of Angels and TV's Dawson's Creek)  and as a song of comfort and healing after 9/11. It was written about the death of Jonathon Melvoin from an overdose of heroin in 1996.  He had been the drummer with which popular, alternative US rock band ?

A: SMASHING PUMPKINS

 8: OCEAN ISLES


1. Separated from the rest of the chain by hundreds of kilometres, they are the westernmost extension of the Aleutians. Which group of treeless islands comprises Bering Island, Medny Island, and two small islets, Sea Lion Rock and Sea Otter Rock ?

A: KOMANDORSKI Islands or COMMANDER Islands


2. Those islands take their name from Commander Vitus Bering who, along with 28 men from his ship’s company died of scurvy after being shipwrecked there in 1741 – what was the name of their ill-fated ship ?

A: ST PIOTR or ST PETER


3. Some of the crew of the St Peter, including naturalist Georg Wilhelm Steller, survived and built themselves a new boat to sail to Kamchatka.  While building it they kept alive eating the meat of a newly discovered 8m long creature which, probably not helped by the sailors’ appetite, is now extinct.  Which sirenian mammal was this ?

A: Steller's SEA COW – ZEEKOE  SJØKU  SEEKUH JÛRØ KARVË

 
9: NATURE OF OZ

1. The descendants of animals introduced to Australia between 1840 and 1907 (coming largely from the Indian subcontinent but also from elsewhere) they number an estimated 700,000.  The only wild, roving herds of their kind in the world, what are they ?

A: Feral CAMELS  KAMELEN

2. Also called the Giant Neotropical Toad, this amphibian was introduced to Australia in 1935 as a pest control measure but is now more trouble than the creatures it was brought in to eat.  By what name is it known ?

A: CANE TOAD, AAGA or MARINE TOAD (Buffo Marinus) (AGAPAD / REUZENPAD / ZEEPAD / RIETPAD) AGAPADDE AGA-KRÖTE RUPÛÞË AGA / DIDÞIOJI RUPÛÞË

3. Named after a 19th century Welsh naturalist, explorer, geographer, anthropologist and biologist who noticed the apparent dividing line during his travels, what name is given to the boundary separating the zoogeographical regions of Asia and Australasia - West of the line are found organisms related to Asiatic species; to the east, mostly organisms related to Australian species ?                                       

A: (Alfred Russell) WALLACE Line


10: ACES HIGH

1. It’s famous nickname is supposed to have been coined in his honour, who was the first pilot to receive Germany’s top bravery award, the Pour le Mérite ?

A: (Blue) Max IMMELMANN


2. Official German sources say Immelmann was brought down by friendly anti-aircraft fire. The British give the ‘kill’ to an aircraft of 25 Squadron Royal Flying Corps.  However, Max’s brother claimed equipment malfunction led to his death.  Invented by Anthony Fokker, what clever piece of equipment did his brother claim had failed ?

A: SYNCHRONISATION MECHANISM* - ZENTRALSTEUERUNG  SYNCHRONISATIE SYNKRONISERING  SINCHRONIZACIJA or …. INTERRUPTER GEAR - INTERRUPT, WÖRTL.: UNTERBRECHUNG  AVBRYTE PERTRAUKIMAS

*It allowed the machine gun to fire though propeller, stopping the gun at very brief intervals


3. With the help of more primitive ‘deflector blades’ and ‘armoured propellers’, who had earlier been the first pilot to have a machine gun fixed on the nose of his airplane ?

A: Roland GARROS

11:  RING MUSIC


1. The subject of a Warren Zevon song, he was famous for his wild fighting style.  What was the nickname of boxer Ray Mancini (and his father Lennie) whose second Lightweight World Title defence in 1982 caused the death of South Korean challenger Duk Koo Kim ?

"BOOM BOOM" Mancini


2. His death was the subject of songs by Bob Dylan and Phil Ochs; which former World Featherweight boxing champion died in 1963, two days after being knocked-out by Sugar Ramos ?

(‘Who Killed …) Davey MOORE


3. Another US World Champion boxer named Davey Moore died in 1988 aged 26, crushed by his own car in a freak accident - leaving fight fans to wonder if the name is cursed!  Which boxing legend, who took this second Davey Moore's WBA Light Middleweight title in 1983, released an album of Salsa music in 2001, shortly before his own near fatal car accident ?

A: Roberto DURAN Samaniego

12: EXODUS


1. In April and May of 1980, a flotilla of small boats brought 125,000 migrants from the Port of Mariel to the United States.  In which country is the Port of Mariel ?

A: CUBA


2. Poet & novelist Ruben (Reinaldo?) Arenas was in the ‘Mariel boatlift’.  In 1993 his autobiography made the New York Times list of the ten best books of the year.  In 2000, with Oscar nominated Javier Bardem (‘Best Actor’), and support cast including Sean Penn & Johnny Depp – it was made into which film of the same name ?

A: ‘BEFORE NIGHT FALLS’


3. Another in the ‘Mariel boatlift‘ was ‘Tony Montana’.  He was the anti-hero of which 1983 motion picture dedicated to Howard Hawks & Ben Hecht ?

A: SCARFACE (Hawks & Hecht scripted the 1932 film ‘Scarface’ starring Paul Muni) 

13: VITAMINS


1. In the 1890s a Dutch doctor, Christiaan Eijkman, discovered it could be cured by eating ‘brown’ unpolished rice. Which illness - in extreme cases it causes weakness of the limbs, irregular heartbeat or even heart failure and death - is caused by a vitamin B1 deficiency ?

A: BERIBERI


2. In 1912, after reading Christiaan Eijkman’s paper on curing beriberi, a Polish biochemist succeeded in isolating the important substance in brown rice. He called such substances ‘vital animes’ or ‘vitamines’ and so was the first to formulate the concept of Vitamins. Who was he?

A: Casimir FUNK

3. Green vegetables and egg yolk are good sources of another vitamin – a deficiency of which leads to extensive bleeding. Fortunately the deficiency is rare because a form of the vitamin is manufactured by intestinal bacteria. What is the name of this vitamin, necessary for blood clotting?

A: Vitamin K or KOAGULATION (in German)

14: FLAGS


1. As can be seen, the flag of Romania is almost identical to that of which African country?  

A: CHAD


2. Many African flags contain representations of weapons. Most of these are traditional weapons, like spears on the flags of Lesotho and Kenya. However, the flag of one country has the image of a Kalashnikov rifle on it. Which country ?

A: MOZAMBIQUE

3. The flag of Bangladesh is quite distinct and unlike most other flags, except two! The design is similar to that of Japan’s, but if you change the red circle to yellow, and the green background to light blue, you will have the flag of which other country ?

A: PALAU 


15: CAPITALS


In this set you will get 3 names of cities that are capitals of a sub-national division, like a province, a state, or department etc.. Name the sub-national division.


1. Of which Brazilian state is Belo Horizonte the capital ?   

A: MINAS GERAIS

2. Of which Italian region is Catanzaro the capital ?   

A: CALABRIA

3. Of what Austrian Bundesland is Graz the capital ?   

A: STEIERMARK (Styria)

 
16: BYZANTIUM


1. Byzantine field armies typically included a component (about 15%) of heavily armoured cavalry, used for shock attacks. Their name was also used sometimes for Parthian, Sarmatian and Roman heavy cavalry. Derived from the Greek for ‘mail-clad’, what was this name ? 

A: CATAPHRACT or KATAPKRAKTOI


2. Born among the lowest class of Byzantine society, the daughter of a circus bear keeper, this courtesan married Justinian in 523. On his accession to the throne in 527, he made her joint-ruler of the empire. During the Nika riots of 532 her leadership quelled the uprising and perhaps saved the empire. What was her name?

A: THEODORA


3. It is often said Romulus Augustulus was the last Roman emperor. This is surely false because the Eastern Roman empire survived until 1453. The last Roman emperor ruled from 1448 to 1453 and, although some ancestors lived in the city of Monemvasia until 1471 when the remains of the empire were sold to the pope, they are not considered Byzantine emperors. What then was the name of the last, recognised Byzantine Emperor ?

A: CONSTANTINE XI or PALAEOLOGUS


17: ITALIA

1. Galileo, Leon Batista Alberti, Leonardo Bruni, Dante, Niccoló Macchiavelli, Michelangelo Buonarroti and Gioacchino Rossini are all buried in the same church in the centre of Firenze. What is the name of that church?

A: SANTA CROCE


2. The largest building erected in Europe in the 18th century was a baroque palace for by the kings of Naples. Sometimes called the ‘Italian Versailles’, it was named after the Italian city in which it is located.  What is its name ? 

A: Palazzo Reale di CASERTA


3. In 1896 Italian and Ethiopian armies met near a village in northern Abyssinia. The Italians, initially full of confidence, were routed in a rare instance of an African army defeating one from Europe. As a direct result Italy signed the treaty of Addis Ababa, recognising Ethiopia as an independent state. What was the name of the battle and that Ethiopian village?

A: ADOWA or ADOWA, ADUWA, or ADUA

18: US STATE

1. Between 1987 and 1989 an artificial closed ecological system was built in the American town Oracle. The aim of this Biosphere 2, the first one being the Earth itself, was to test if people could survive in a closed environment. The experiment proved unsuccessful. In the south-eastern part of which American state can you still visit Biosphere 2 ? 

A: ARIZONA


2. In 2001 the baseball team from Phoenix, Arizona shocked the US public by becoming the youngest expansion franchise team ever to win the World Series. In one of the most exciting World Series ever, this 4 year old team beat reigning champions New York Yankees 4 – 3. What is the name of that baseball team?

A: Arizona DIAMONDBACKS

3. In the northern Verde Valley region, near the geographical centre of Arizona, lies a city with a population of about 10,000. The city itself is a tourist trap, packed with souvenir shops and the like, but the scenery around it is breathtaking. The city - named after the wife of its first postmaster - is located between the Red Rocks, an area of outstanding natural beauty popular with fans of hiking and mountain biking. What is the city’s name ?

A: SEDONA

19: NUCLEAR AFFAIRS


1. Before North Korea, which was the last country to conduct a nuclear bomb test ?

A: PAKISTAN  (do we mean any test, or THEIR FIRST before N Korea FIRST ?)


2. Much of North Korea’s nuclear know-how came from a Pakistani scientist who created a black market in nuclear technology (also selling to Libya and Iran). The mastermind behind Pakistan’s nuclear programme, he became a national hero after Pakistan conducted nuclear tests in 1998. Following US pressure in 2001, after details of his business affairs emerged, President Pervez Musharraf had him removed from his job as director of the country’s nuclear lab. Who is he ?

A: Abdul Qadeer KHAN


3. This July India successfully carried out a first test of its nuclear-capable ballistic missile with a range of 4,000 kilometres. It is named after which Hindu god of fire?

A: AGNI

20: BLOGOSPHERE


1. She is the vice president of the European Commission & commissioner for communication. In 2004, she became the first European Commissioner to write a blog. The comments section of her site quickly became a hotspot for arguments about European Union policy. Who is she ?

A: Margot Elisabeth WALLSTRÖM


2. Another Swedish politician with a blog commenting on current affairs is the former prime minister who became foreign minister following the conservatives election victory this September. Who ?

A: Carl BILDT


3. Here in France, the country’s prime minister from 1995 to 1997 also has a blog. In December 2004 he was in the news when he was convicted of mishandling public funds; since which his political career was on hold until he was re-elected mayor of Bordeaux in October. Who is he ?

A: Alain JUPPE


21: ANCIENT AMERICANS

1. A hallmark of their culture was the use of a distinctively-shaped fluted rock spear point. Since the mid 20th century, the standard theory among archaeologists has been that the people of this culture (also known as Paleo-Indians) were the first inhabitants of the Americas. What is the name of a prehistoric Native American culture that first appears in the archaeological record of North America around 13,500 years ago, at the end of the last ice age ?

A: CLOVIS or LLANO culture


2. In 1996 two spectators attending annual hydroplane races found a skull on a bank of the Columbia River. It belonged to a man who lived between 5,000 and 9,500 years ago. It is hoped the skeleton will shed light on who were the first Americans, but for the moment it is involved in controversy - the Native American Umatilla tribe want the remains to bury them according to tribal tradition. However, their claim is contested by researchers who want to conduct further study and who claim anyway that it is probably not any direct ancestor of Umatillas and so does not belong to them. The skeleton lies in a federal repository awaiting resolution, by what name is it known ?

A: KENNEWICK man

3. The oldest dated skeleton from the Americas is a young woman with African features. It was found in eastern Brazil in 1975 and dating has determined it to be 11,500 years old. The anatomy of her skull and teeth likens her to Africans and Australasians. Brazilian anthropologists suggest she travelled across the Bering Strait, perhaps following the coastline by boat, from northeast Asia, where her ancestors had lived for tens of thousands of years since exiting Africa. What is the name of the skeleton?

A: LUZIA


22: 1906

1. In November 1906 US President Theodore Roosevelt undertook the first ever foreign trip by a sitting President of the USA. Where did he go ?

A: PANAMA (to inspect the construction of the canal)


2. On 31 May 1906 the King of Spain was married. As the newlywed returned to Madrid’s royal palace, a bouquet concealing a bomb was thrown at his carriage. Deflected by an electric wire, it landed to the right of the vehicle, killing 18 people and 2 horses but spared the royal couple. What was the name of this fortunate king ?

A: ALFONSO XIII


3. In 1906 this early modern dance pioneer first stirred New York and Europe with her exotic choreography, touring with a work called ‘Radha’. Her dances were highly imaginative and spectacular, inspired by the arts and religions of Egypt, India, and East Asia. She never received formal training but had a major impact on ballet and modern dance. With Ted Shawn, who she married in 1914, she founded the Denishawn Schools in Los Angeles and in New York City (1920). Who was she ?

A: Ruth ST DENIS  or Ruth DENNIS her birth name

23: PARIS 1924

1. The author of the best selling book The Common Sense Book of Baby and Child Care won a gold medal in rowing at the 1924 Summer Olympics. Who ?

A: Dr Benjamin SPOCK


2. William DeHart Hubbard was a track and field athlete who was the first African American to win an individual Olympic gold medal. At which event ?

A: LONG JUMP VERSPRINGEN) LENGDEHOPP WEITSPRUNG ÐUOLIS Á TOLÁ


3. The most successful athlete of the 1924 Olympics was a Finnish runner who had emigrated to United States at the age of 17. He won 4 Gold and 2 Silver medals in Paris. Four years later he won another gold and silver and then retired. He career has inspired a Finnish phrase, meaning a quick exit from somewhere. Who was he ?

A: Ville RITOLA

24: OCEAN LITERATURE

1. After a harrowing shipwreck, a boy finds himself adrift in the Pacific Ocean, trapped on a 26-foot lifeboat with a wounded zebra, a spotted hyena, a seasick orang-utan, and a 450-pound Bengal tiger named Richard Parker. After much gore and infighting, he and Richard Parker remain the boat's sole passengers, drifting for 227 days through shark-infested waters while fighting hunger, the elements, and an overactive imagination. Name the book and author!

A: Yann MARTEL and “LIFE OF PI”


2. The Legend of 1900 (La Leggenda del Pianista sull'Oceano) is a 1998 film starring Tim Roth by the Italian filmmaker Giuseppe Tornatore. It is based on a play Novecento by a bestselling Italian whose novels include Oceano Mare (Ocean Sea, 1993), Seta (Silk, 1996), City (1999), Senza Sangue (Without Blood, 2002) and i (This Story, 2005).  Who is the author ?

A: Alessandro BARICCO


3. ‘Naufragé Volontaire’ (The Voyage of the Heretique) is a 1958 book by a French biologist and physician famous for sailing across the Atlantic Ocean in a small boat. He theorized that a human being could very well survive the trip across the ocean without provisions and decided to test his theory - in the hope of saving thousands of lives lost at sea. He survived by fishing with a self-made harpoon and harvesting surface plankton with a small net. He lost 25 kg, but made it from the Canary Islands to Barbados. What was his name ?

A: Alain BOMBARD


25: L-ARTISTS


1. This painter, who died of bubonic plague in 1348, lived his entire adult live in the Italian city of Siena. His most famous works are frescos on the wall of the Palazzo Pubblico - especially the allegorical works ‘Effects of good and bad government on town and country’. Who was he ?


A: Ambrogio LORENZETTI

2. ‘Migrant Mother’ is probably the most famous picture of which photographer who specialised in depicting the consequences of the Great Depression ?


A: Dorothea LANGE

3. Strolling through Vienna you are bound to notice the pure, unadorned buildings constructed by this architect, born in Brno in 1870, who believed that anything which could not be justified on rational grounds was superfluous and should be eliminated. He acted as a model and a seer for architects of the 1920s. What was his name?

A: Adolf LOOS

 26: RIVER ISLE


1. Annexed by Austria in 1913 it was the Hapsburgs’ final territorial acquisition (actually a re-acquisition). With a Turkish name meaning ‘Island fortress’, which island on the Danube was nicknamed the 'Gibraltar of the Ottoman Empire' ?

A: ADA-KALEH


2. Situated 3 km downstream from Orsova, the Romanian Danube island of Ada Kaleh was submerged in 1971 during the building of which hydro plant ?

A: IRON GATES Dam (ijzeren Poort) JERNPORTEN EISERNES TOR GELEÞINIAI VARTAI


3. In an 1872 novel 1872 Ada Kaleh is renamed ‘Island of Nobody’ and is an almost mythic symbol of peace, seclusion & beauty, juxtaposed with the material world outside.   An important Hungarian dramatist & novelist who wrote prolifically in Magyar, who penned that novel, entitled ‘The Golden Man’ ?

A: Mór JÓKAI

27: ‘CULTURALLY SIGNIFICANT’

1. Deemed ‘Culturally significant’ by the US Library of Congress, its title inspired a pop group’s name and a recurring phrase in its dialogue inspired a Buddy Holly song.  Which film’s main soundtrack theme was borrowed from ‘Lorena’, a popular song of the American Civil War period, which you hear now performed by Mark Gardner and Rex Rideout ?

‘THE SEARCHERS’ 1956 John Ford film, Wayne often says “That’ll Be The Day!”


2. The famous pose adopted by John Wayne at the end of the film, holding his right elbow with his left hand, was a tribute by imitation to which cowboy legend of the silent screen – his widow and boy played Mrs Jorgenson and son Brad Jorgenson in The Searchers ?


A: Harry CAREY (Olive and Harry Jnr.)


3. Vera Miles, who played Laurie Jorgensen, had a long career after The Searchers.  She played Lila Crane in which film - reprising the role 23 years later in a sequel wherein she is killed by the character who murders her sister in the original ?


A: PSYCHO plays Janet Leigh’s sister)


28: ‘147’

1. The 147 is a compact automobile first introduced to the market in the year 2000. It was voted European Car of the Year in 2001 despite, according to most reviewers, extremely light steering, a cumbersome gearshift, unsupportive seats, a lack of interior space and a very poor resale value. Who is the car’s maker ?

A: ALFA ROMEO


2. Can you tell me, in less than 30 seconds, the hexadecimal equivalent of the decimal number 147 ?  Your time starts now.

A: 93        (immediate answer needed if given to the opposition)


3. The year 147 AD saw great festivities in Rome. It was the heyday of the Roman empire, at the time led by Antoninus Pius, the fourth of the ‘Five Good Emperors’. But of course the Romans didn’t think of it as the year 147 AD. What was the year according to their long-range calendar?

A: 900 (but also accept 899 as until April 21 it was still 899)

(Year calculated from the founding of Rome in 753 BC, I put in ‘long-range’ because occasionally shorter calendars were used, for instance ‘years since the last emperor’)

29: ELECTRONICS

1. In 1923, two years before John Logie Baird showed the first television image (a ventriloquitst’s dummy), the first patent for a ‘television system’ was filed. And not in Scotland but in Pittsburgh, by an 1889-born Russian television pioneer. From 1925 to 1930 he perfected a television system based on cathode ray tubes. What was the name of this pioneer of early television broadcasting ?

A: Vladimir ZWORYKIN


2. A FET is a transistor in which the shape of the conduction channel (and hence the conductivity) are changed when a potential difference is applied. What does the acronym F.E.T. stand for ?

A: FIELD EFFECT TRANSISTOR


3. In the late 1970s and early ‘80s the TRS-80 desktop microcomputer was launched by a company through the Radio Shack stores. The basic model I was shipped with a memory of 4 kilobytes and a processor with a 1.77 MHz clock speed. In 2000 the name of this company was changed to ‘Radio Shack Corporation’ – which Texas based company, originally founded as a leather supply store, had made these early computers?

A: TANDY

30 : FLORA

1. Stars of Cartoon Network, name the Powerpuff Girl whose name, like that of ‘Buttercup’ (SMØRBLOMST, HAHNENFUß, VËDRYNAS) has a connection with flora ?


A: BLOSSOM BLOMSTRING   BLÜTE   ÞIEDAS              (‘Bubbles’ is the 3rd Powerpuff Girl)


2. According to convention in (mainstream) Manga comics and animation, what is symbolised by a flower blossom falling from its stem ?

A: DEATH or more commonly, SEX


3. An annual National Cherry Blossom Festival which draws 700,000 visitors, next due to be held 31st March - 15th April 2007, marks the 95th celebration of the original gift of 3,000 Yoshino cherry trees by the Mayor of Tokyo to the people of which capital city in 1912 ?

A: WASHINGTON D.C.

 

TIE BREAKERS PART 1


1. Earlier this year drilling in the Baltic, off Poland, revealed the wreck of a German aircraft carrier. It had been launched in December 1938 but was never completed. In 1947, Soviet ships and aircraft used it as target practice, sinking it. What was the ship’s name ?

A: GRAF ZEPPELIN

2. Probably the strangest of the flags of US states, and containing two family crests, to which eastern state does this belong?

A: MARYLAND

 3. A subatomic particle with no electric charge and about the same weight of a proton, the existence of the neutron was first suggested in 1932 by an Englishman who subsequently conducted a series of experiments which confirmed his proposition. What was the name of this discoverer of the neutron ?

A: James CHADWICK

 
TIE-BREAKERS PART 2


In the event of any further ties, the team to hand in their answers first wins.


1 Gösta Lilliehook, Gustaf Dyrssen, Bo Lindman, Sven Thofelt, Johan Oxenstierna, Willy Grut and Lars Hall (twice), all of them from Sweden, were Olympic champions in which event that was won by Swedes on every occasion but one from its Olympic debut in 1912 until 1956 ? (Modern)

A: PENTATHLON


2 Hieronymus Fracastorius (Girolamo Fracastoro) was an Italian physician, poet, astronomer, and geologist. He wrote about the temperature of wines, the rise of the Nile, poetry, the mind, and the soul, but is best known for naming a disease in his 1530 poem "... sive morbus gallicus".  Which disease ? 

A: SYPHILIS (morbus gallicus = French disease)


3 The first cervical vertebra is abbreviated C1 and supports the skull. Its appearance is different from the other spinal vertebrae: it's a ring of bone made up of two lateral masses joined at the front and back by the anterior arch and the posterior arch. Its name is shared with which character in Greek mythology ?  

A: ATLAS


4 Native Americans gathered in the ‘Indian Territories’ in an effort to preserve their autonomy and tried to form their own ‘Indian’ state. However, the Federal government rejected this idea in favour of a creating a single state combining the Oklahoma and Indian Territories, thus ‘Oklahoma’ became the 46th state of the Union on 16 November 1907. The native Americans, whose aims were frustrated, had intended to name their State after which Cherokee chief ? 

A: SEQUOIAH


5 What is the first name of ‘Cubby’ Broccoli’s widow who took over from her husband in producing the James Bond films – the latest being Casino Royale ?  

A: BARBARA